Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Serving one billion monthly requests online

Today, I will blog about serving one monthly billion requests from a huge website of mine. I will speak about the architecture and network used to it. As it was recently reported on Cloudflare:



That makes around 37 million total requests per 24 hours and around 428 requests per second.


Half of the requests are cached through CloudFlare and the rest are served from Highwinds CDN. CloudFlare CDN directly is configured on top of Highwinds CDN. While this may sound vague, this means all of the website requests are passed through CloudFlare's CDN. CloudFlare's system is able to filter requests and they deliver .js and .css files from their network; the rest of the files (.jpg, .mp4 and .webm) are served from Highwinds. Reports from their Highwind's phenomenal interface SiteTracker 3.0: 


Highwinds is configured on top of Leaseweb's dedicated servers. Leaseweb is my favorite server provider. They are extremely reliable and operate their own solid network which is configured on top of Highwinds server. Traffic from one main server: 
Load on the server is tolerable (Around 800GB of bandwidth daily) due to Highwind's efficient caching. A quota of 34TB is served on that server (whether they are being used or not). They are never fully being consumed so I always pay for the reserved bandwidth that is never used.  I am bit stingy so I don't want anyone sharing the bandwidth, I don't want any competition.

I also occasionally use Google Cloud Console to deliver .json files

What is remarkable and common about Highwinds, Cloudflare and Leaseweb is that all they all operate their own networks.

Cloudflare owns 115 datacenters worldwide, and the number changes every one or two weeks whereas Leaseweb has a 5.5 Tbps bandwidth capacity and Highwinds operates multiple 10GigE backbones with stable PoP houses solid state drives (SSDs).

So, if I have to sum up the architecture used, it would look like this:


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1 comment:

  1. These are amazing statistical about the number of online requests you tend to serve on a monthly. Thanks for sharing this amazing piece of information here

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